Frequently asked questions from young adults

Are you wondering how military service affects your health insurance? Or are you planning to spend some time abroad, and want to know what you need to bear in mind? Are you not sure whether your policy is suitable for you? SWICA answers these questions and many others for you (and your parents) on this page.

Entering a new age bracket

On 1 January after your 18th birthday. That is when you enter the «young adult» age bracket, and no longer benefit from the family discount for children and young people.
We cannot say exactly how much more expensive your premiums will become until October, which is when we know what the premiums for the new year will be. Essentially, though, you can expect your premium to more than double. Of course, this depends to a large extent on the insurance products you choose, your chosen excess, and also where you live.
Your premiums are going up because you are entering a different age bracket (from «child» to «young adult»). The Federal Health Insurance Act (KVG) stipulates financial relief for families with children under the age of majority. That is why health insurers are able to offer discounts on their premiums for children and young people. These discounts no longer apply when they reach adulthood.
There are no products that SWICA recommends especially for young adults. We recommend that all of our customers take out COMPLETA TOP and COMPLETA PRAEVENTA supplementary insurance plans, which fill the gaps in mandatory basic insurance and support a healthy lifestyle with substantial contributions (for example to gym memberships, yoga courses and a range of other forms of exercise).
That depends on the state of your health. A good rule of thumb is that a low excess (CHF 300) is only worth it if you are spending CHF 1'500 or more each year on healthcare. If you are healthy and almost never need to visit the doctor, it's worth opting for the high excess (CHF 2'500) in order to reduce the premiums you pay. Don't forget: the high excess also means that you must be able to pay a corresponding share of the costs if something happens.
You can choose an excess of CHF 300, 500, 1'000, 1'500, 2'000 or 2'500. You can adjust the amount to suit your needs every calendar year. Notification of a lower excess must reach SWICA by 30 November, while notification of a higher excess must reach SWICA by 31 December.
If you are insured under the general practitioner (GP) model, please remember to report that you have switched to a new doctor. You can let SWICA know about your new GP here.

Notify us about a new GP
Your current policy shows you what insurance products you have taken out at present. It has probably been a while for your parents as well since they chose suitable products for you. Your situation now is not the same as it was a few years ago, and SWICA wants this to be reflected in your insurance cover. If you have any questions regarding products or your insurance cover, SWICA would be happy to discuss them with you over the phone.

Policy separation

No. SWICA will only separate the policies at your request. You will remain on the family policy for the time being unless you notify SWICA of your decision by 30 November.
Not automatically. You can choose whether you want your own policy when you enter the new age bracket, or whether you would prefer to remain on the family policy. You will remain on the family policy for the time being unless SWICA receives a decision from you by the end of November. Your own policy or staying on the family policy? We have provided a guide here to help you with your decision.
SWICA recommends that you take out your own separate policy so that you start dealing with your own insurance arrangements and become more and more familiar with them. No matter whether you have separate or joint policies, upon reaching adulthood, you are responsible for your own insurance in any case.

One benefit of having your own policy is that you can set up your own account for any amounts to be credited (for example for gym memberships), and you alone can view and edit your data. The last point can be a drawback if your parents are still taking care of your health insurance. If this is the case, you can give one of your parents power of attorney.

If you stay on the family policy, your parents can continue to take care of your health insurance (with limitations*). This means that you will be unable to set up your own account for amounts to be credited, and your health information will not just be available to you. Your parents will be able to see where you have been treated and when, for example.

*Particularly sensitive data is not made available to the parents of adult children.
No. Premiums are calculated irrespective of the arrangement in terms of policies. If you get a group discount on supplementary insurance from SWICA under your family policy (for example through your parents' employers), however, you will lose this benefit if you switch to your own policy.
Yes, you can. However, SWICA must separate the policies by the time you move out, unless you spend the weekends at your parents' house and are still registered as a resident there. You will find a short list of the advantages and disadvantages of staying on the family policy as an adult here.
Since you are now (or will soon become) an adult, your parents will not be able to continue taking care of your health insurance without limitations from next calendar year. If you stay on the family policy, your parents can continue to take care of your health insurance, albeit with limitations*. If you would like to take advantage of the benefits of having your own policy but also want your parents on board for support, you can give one of them power of attorney.

*Particularly sensitive data is not made available to the parents of adult children.
If you are still on the family policy, your parents will be able to see from the benefit statements when and where you receive treatment. Particularly sensitive data (such as the reasons for treatment) is not made available to the parents of adult children. If you have your own policy, only you will be able to view your data, unless you have given one of your parents comprehensive power of attorney.
Yes, that's possible. However, if you stay on the family policy then the account that is set up for credited amounts will apply for every family member on the policy. If you would now like to have your own policy, you can use the same payment profile as for the family policy (provided your parents agree) and set up your own account for amounts to be credited. This arrangement is recommended if you don't have enough income and your parents are supporting you financially. You can change the method of payment, the payment account and the account for amounts to be credited online at any time.

Saving money

You can

  • choose a more affordable basic insurance plan
  • check whether you qualify for discounted premiums
  • take advantage of SWICA's group partnerships
  • live a healthy lifestyle with BENEVITA
  • opt for a high excess (CHF 2'500.–), provided you spend less than CHF 1'500.– per year on healthcare costs

You can find more detailed tips for saving money here.
You may well be. People on low incomes may be entitled to discounted premiums under the Federal Health Insurance Act (KVG). This is often the case for "young adults", as schoolchildren, students and trainees don't earn a proper salary yet. Depending on how much you earn, the calculation of your entitlement to discounted premiums may take your parents' economic situation into account. The cantons each have their own procedures for applying for discounted premiums.

Find the relevant office

Moving house and travelling

You can let SWICA know your new address online. SWICA will also separate the policies by the time you move out, because once you move away you will no longer be living in the same household as your parents. This does not apply if you spend the weekends at your parents' house. In this case, you can remain on the family policy and simply update your correspondence address if necessary.

Update address
If you move further away, your new home could be in a different premium region. Switzerland is divided into regions in which different premiums apply. You might therefore see a difference in your premium invoices.

If you have taken out FAVORIT CASA, FAVORIT SANTE or HMO PROVITA basic insurance, your GP (family doctor) or health centre must be registered in the canton where you live or work. Bear this in mind if you move to a different canton.
It depends on what you are doing. Spending several months travelling, studying abroad for a year for your degree, or relocating abroad indefinitely all have different consequences for your health insurance. SWICA recommends a personalised consultation in these cases. Please feel free to get in touch at any time. This overview outlines the insurance products that you can take out in connection with various types of stay abroad.

Get in touch now

School, university and military service

Since you typically work more than eight hours per week as a trainee, you are insured through your employer against occupational and non-occupational accidents. This means that you don't need corresponding cover from SWICA, and you can exclude accident cover from your health insurance. If you take a break from work after completing your training, don't forget to include accident cover from SWICA again. You can do this easily online at any time.

You can also check whether your training provider is insured with SWICA. If they are, you can benefit from discounts on selected supplementary insurance plans.
Make sure that you continue your accident cover with SWICA. If you don't work at least eight hours per week for the same employer, then you are also not insured through them against occupational and non-occupational accidents. If you start working, you can easily exclude accident cover from SWICA again online at any time.
Congratulations! If you start working you can exclude accident cover from SWICA. This is because, if you work more than eight hours per week for the same employer, you are insured through them against occupational and non-occupational accidents.
You can suspend (pause) your basic insurance if you are going to spend more than 60 days completing your military or civilian service. The federal government will pay the costs for the duration of your service. This means that SWICA will only invoice you for the costs of any supplementary insurance during that time. To be able to make all of the necessary arrangements, we will need your marching orders or your call-up for civilian service. You can send SWICA a copy via the app, by email or by post.